Vegetarian Yellow Split Peas with Ginger and Cumin (Dal)

Dal is an Indian lentil stew that is delicious for breakfast, lunch, or dinner. Dal has an extensive history as a staple food in Indian and South Asian diets. I love dal as a comforting and hearty stew with lots of warming spices. It works well as a main course for breakfast or a side dish for lunch or dinner along with basmati or cauliflower rice.

Dal also has some amazing health benefits! The split peas are a heart healthy source of fiber and the spices (turmeric, ginger, cumin, coriander, and fennel) are anti-inflammatory and support healthy digestion.

I hope you enjoy my take on this wonderful dish!

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Serves 4-6

  • 1 cup yellow split peas
  • 5 cups water
  • 2 tsp turmeric powder
  • 1 carrot, chopped
  • 2 small red potatoes, chopped
  • 1 small yellow onion, chopped
  • 1 Tbs organic unrefined coconut oil
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 2 tsp ground coriander
  • 1 tsp salt
  • ½ tsp black pepper
  • 1 tsp whole cumin seeds
  • 1 tsp whole fennel seeds
  • 1 inch piece fresh ginger, peeled and minced
  • 3 handfuls of baby spinach
  • 1 cup cilantro, chopped
  • 2 small tomatoes, diced
  • Juice of ½ lemon

Bring the water, split peas, and turmeric to a boil in a large stock pot. Once it’s come to a rolling boil, turn down the heat and cover. Allow the split peas to simmer for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally, until they are soft but not falling apart.

In the mean time, heat the oil in a large pan on medium heat. Sauté the onion, cumin seed, fennel seed, and ginger for 5 minutes or until the onion is soft and translucent. Add the potato and carrot, salt and pepper, ground spices, and the onion/spice mixture to the pot of lentils and simmer 20 minutes more. Add the spinach and cook about 5 minutes until the spinach is wilted. Turn off the heat and stir in the lemon juice. Garnish each serving with chopped tomatoes and cilantro, and serve warm.

Paleo Pumpkin Pancakes

IMG_3281These grain-free pumpkin pancakes are delicious any time of the year, but are an especially satisfying treat on cool Autumn mornings. Try serving them with a small amount of Grade B pure maple syrup and chopped hazelnuts. Pumpkin is a great source of fiber, beta-carotene, and Vitamin C and a wonderful way to eat seasonally.

Serves 4

  • 3 eggs
  • 1 can pumpkin puree or 2 cups cooked pumpkin
  • 3 Tbs butter or coconut oil, melted
  • 1 Tbs honey (optional)
  • 2 cups almond flour
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 2 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1 tsp ground ginger
  • 1/4 tsp ground nutmeg
  • approx 1 Tbs coconut oil for cooking

Beat eggs in a medium mixing bowl. Add pumpkin puree, honey, and 3 Tbs melted butter or oil and mix well. In another bowl mix the flour, baking soda, and spices. Add the dry ingredients to the wet mixture and blend well. Melt a small amount of coconut oil in a large skillet over medium low heat. When the skillet is hot but the oil is not smoking, pour 1/3 cup portions of pancake batter into the pan so that the pancakes fill the pan but don’t touch.

Cover the skillet with a lid and allow the pancakes to cook for approximately 3 to 5 minutes before flipping to cook the second side. Test the pancakes before flipping by sliding a spatula under them. They are ready to flip when the bottom has browned and the spatula easily slides under. Cover and cook the second side for an additional 3 to 5 minutes or until both sides are browned but not burnt, and the pancake is no longer wet in the middle. The pancakes can be kept warm in a low oven (150-200 degrees F) while you cook the rest of the batter. Add more coconut oil to the skillet as needed so the pancakes don’t stick.

Note: Grain-free pancakes are more delicate than typical pancakes. They burn more easily and should be cooked at a lower temperature. They cook more evenly when the batter is carefully spread out in the pan with the back of a spoon.